Aparados da Serra National Park – Brazil

maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus)

Aparados da Serra National Park

One of Brazil’s first national parks, Aparados da Serra National Park was established in 1959 to protect the grassland, forest, and cliff vegetation refuge ecosystems, and the impressive scenery located within the national park. One of the Aparados da Serra National Park’s main attraction is the famous Itaimbezinho Canyon.

Located in the Serra Geral range of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states in southern Brazil the Aparados da Serra National Park is over 25,000 acres. According to the Duke University’s Center for Tropical Conservation, this national park is too small to be effective for the conservation of top food chain predators such as the mountain lion (Puma concolor) or the crowned eagle (Harpyhaliaetus coronatus), that need large hunting areas to survive, and is insufficient for the protection of each of the national park’s distinct environment.

The Aparados da Serra National Park is located in the temperate zone, with mild temperatures and well-defined seasons, including several frosts and at least one day of snow in the plateau region each year. Rainfall is abundant and well distributed throughout the year, ranging from 60 – 90 inches a year, with slightly greater rain on the plateau than on the plains.

Despite the relatively small size of this park, the Aparados da Serra National Park has over 140 species of birds, nearly 50 species of mammals, and almost 40 species of amphibian. This rich biodiversity is a result of the Aparados da Serra National Park’s diverse relief and its location at the region of ecological convergence of Atlantic Rain Forest, grassland and Araucaria forest habitats. The Aparados da Serra National Park has a nice selection of bromeliads and orchids. Some notable wildlife species found in this national park, include the mountain lion, ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis), brown howling monkey (Alouatta guariba), capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), dusky-legged guan (Penelope obscura), and spotted nothuras (Nothura maculosa), green-billed toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus), purple-bellied parrot (Triclaria malachitacea), crowned eagle and the Red-spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona pretrei).

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Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park – Indonesia

Java Deer (Rusa timorensis)

Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park – Indonesia

The Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park consists of over 400,000 acres on Halmahera Island, the biggest island in the North Maluku province of Indonesia. The Maluku Islands are a group of islands to the east of Sulawesi Island, Indonesia. Historically known as the “Spice Islands”, the Maluku Islands were once recognized as the only source of cloves and nutmeg.

The Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park was established in 2004 for the protection of endangered species and is part of the Wallacea biodiversity hotspot, which encompasses the central islands of Indonesia east of Java, Bali, and Borneo, and west of the province of New Guinea, and the whole of Timor Leste. The ecology of the Maluku Islands has fascinated naturalists for centuries. The vegetation of Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park consists mainly of lowland and montane rainforest.

The Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park contains kauri (Agathis spp.), bitangor tree (Calophyllum inophyllum), bintuang tree (Octomeles sumatrana), Amugis (Koordersiodendron pinnatum), taun tree (Pometia pinnata), merbau (Intsia bijuga), canarium nut tree (Canarium indicum), Bur flower tree (Anthocephalus chinensis) and nyatoh (Palaquium obtusifolium).

There are nearly 30 species of mammals found in Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park, including Javan deer(Rusa timorensis),ornate cuscus (Phalanger ornatus), the latter is endemic to Indonesia.

Over 200 bird species, including at least 23 endemic species, are found in Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park. The Wallace’s standarwing (Semioptera wallacii), is one of the national park’s biggest attractions. Like other birds-of-paradise, the male of this species gathers in the morning at a display area and performs for the attending females, trying to entice them to mate with him. This usually lasts for one to two hours and then the birds disperse into the forest to feed.

Another attraction for birdwatchers in the Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park is the endemic ivory-breasted pitta (Pitta maxima). This is a large pitta with white and red underparts, black head and upperparts, and light green wings. The ivory-breasted pitta is arguably one of the most handsome of all the pittas.

Another prize for birdwatchers that can be found in the Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park is the ultra elusive, invisible rail (Habroptila wallacii). Until several years ago, the invisible rail had been seen by only a handful of people, acquiring quasi mythical status. Then a local guide found a nest near his house and the first photographs of the bird in the wild were taken. Another name for this bird is the drumming rail, derived from the very singular bass sound it produces when calling, which is similar to the sound of a drum beat. Sometimes a park visitor may still hear the bird’s drumming from inside high grass or other foliage, although never seeing the actual bird.

Some of the other bird species found in the Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park are the Halmahera cuckoo-shrike (Coracina parvula), Sombre kingfisher (Todiramphus funebris), white cockatoo (Cacatua alba), blue and white kingfisher (Halcyon diops), dusky-brown oriole (Oriolus phaeochromus), Halmahera flowerpecker (Dicaeum schistaceiceps), Moluccan goshawk (Accipiter henicogrammus), Blyth’s hornbill (Rhyticeros plicatus), dusky scrubfowl (Megapodius freycinet), long-billed crow (Corvus validus), grey-headed fruit dove (Ptilinopus hyogastrus), and purple dollarbird (Eurystomus azureus).

Some of the reptiles and amphibians found in Aketajawe-Lolobata National Park include the Moluccan callulops Frog (Callulops Dubius), mountain rainforest frog (Cophixalus montanus), Weber’s sailfin lizard (Hydrosaurus weberi), and monitor lizard (Varanus spp.).

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Lambir Hills National Park – Malaysia

Lambir Hills National Park  -  Malaysia

Lambir Hills National Park – Malaysia

Protecting one of the world’s most complex and diverse forest ecosystems, Lambir Hills National Park was created in 1975. Within an area that is less than 7,000 hectares, scientists have found that this national park has the greatest level of plant biodiversity on earth. Nearly 1,200 species of trees are found within Lambir Hills National Park. Along with such diverse plant life comes diverse wildlife, and Lambir Hills National Park with over 300 species of ants, nearly 250 species of birds, more than 60 species of mammals, nearly 50 species of reptiles, and 20 species of frogs and is a rich kaleidoscope of biodiversity.
Some of the birds found in Lambir Hills National Park include the Bornean bristlehead (Pityriasis gymnocephala), garnet pitta (Erythropitta granatina), green broadbill (Calyptomena viridis), rufous-tailed shama (Trichixos pyrropygus), crested goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus), rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros), dark-throated oriole (Oriolus xanthonotus), rufous-collared kingfisher (Actenoides concretus), dusky broadbill (Corydon sumatranus), banded kingfisher (Lacedo pulchella), rufous-backed kingfisher (Ceyx rufidorsa), hook-billed bulbul (Setornis criniger), large-tailed nightjar (Caprimulgus macrurus), dark-throated oriole (Oriolus xanthonotus), rumped flowerpecker (Prionochilus xanthopygius), black-throated wren-babbler (Napothera atrigularis), Bornean blue flycatcher (Cyornis superbus), blue-headed pitta (Hydrornis baudii), Hose’s broadbill (Calyptomena hosii), and brown hawk-owl (Ninox scutulata).

Some of the mammals found in the national park include flying squirrels, wild pigs, gibbons, a variety of monkeys, and deer. Large mammals such as the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) are absent or very rare due to the small size of the forest and illegal hunting.

Compact and conveniently located, just 20 miles south of Miri in Sarawak on the island of Borneo, Lambir Hills National Park is one of the most accessible and beautiful national parks in Malaysia. Lambir Hills National Park is composed mainly of sandstone hills and lowland dipterocarp forest, with some small areas of heath forest. Lambir Hills National Park has dozens of sparkling waterfalls and bathing pools scattered about the rugged rainforest that rises up to over 1,500 feet above sea level in some areas.
Lambir Hills National Park’s unique topography and its complex ecosystem have made it an important site for rainforest study. In fact, several research institutes have scientists permanently stationed in the national park studying its natural history.
Another of Lambir Hills National Park’s many attractions is the national park’s interesting selection of forest walks, which range from gentle 15-minute strolls to arduous all-day jungle treks. Most of the nation park’s trails are interlinked, so it is very easy to take more than one walk in a single day.

The Latak waterfall trail is the shortest, easiest and best known of Lambir Hills National Park’s trails. This is an especially popular trail with day visitors from Miri, particularly on the weekend. This shaded trail follows a fast-flowing stream to the 75 foot Latak waterfall. Along the way there are two small waterfalls, but the main attraction is the Latak waterfall at the end of the trail. Emptying into a large forest pool surrounded by steep rock walls, the Latak waterfall is breath-taking to behold. Facilities such as picnic areas, changing rooms, and bathrooms are located near this pool area. Swimming in this beautiful pool is allowed, but some parts of the pool are quite deep making it unsafe for non-swimmers and small children.
Shortly before reaching the Latak Waterfall, the Pantu trail branches off to the left and leads up to a series of steep steps. At the top of these steps there is a 130 feet tree tower designed to give visitors a view of life in the forest canopy, including many birds, insects, epiphytes, ferns and orchids that cannot be seen from the ground. Lambir Hills National Park has a series of tree towers, a canopy walkway and a canopy crane that provide access to various elements of rainforest’s vertical structure. Shortly beyond the tree tower, the trail branches off to the left and leads to the Nibong waterfall.

Then there is the long trail to the summit of Bukit Lambir, Lambir Hills National Park’s highest point. This summit trail is quite steep in at times, and can be difficult for some, but it is a trek worth taking, if you are able. There is a superb view from the summit, including the transition from dipterocarp forest to heath forest, and the beautiful flowering wild orchids. On the way down, there is another beautiful pool at the base of the Dinding waterfall that you will want to see.

A study in 2008 revealed that six of Lambir Hills National Park’s seven species of hornbills have disappeared from the national park. Also the number of carnivore, raptor, and primate species had declined significantly since 1980. The study recommended that conservation efforts in the national park should focus on law enforcement to protect wildlife from illegal hunting within and around the park.

Rajah Brooke's Birdwing (Trogonoptera brookiana)

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You Can Help Create Atewa Hills National Park – Ghana

Long-tailed pangolin (Uromanis tetradactyla)

You can help create an new national park! Help create Atewa Hills National Park as Ghana’s 6th national park

The Atewa Range Forest Reserve is Ghana’s most biodiverse — and most threatened — wilderness area. There is wide consensus among scientists and NGO’s that the reserve should be protected as Ghana’s 6th national park: the Atewa Hills National Park. SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is working with domestic and international organizations to make the Atewa Hills National Park a reality. Located near Kibi, halfway between Accra and Kumasi, the Atewa Range Forest Reserve is home to the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog (Conraua derooi; a close relative of the world’s largest frog, the Goliath Frog Conraua goliath). Numerous other amphibian species as well as a diverse non-amphibious flora and fauna live in the reserve.The Atewa forest is listed as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by BirdLife International and is home to 700+ butterfly species.

Save The Frogs GhanaAs recently as 2007, the multi-national ALCOA was seeking permission to conduct mountaintop-removal bauxite mining on three mountains in the reserve. There is continuous threat from other mining companies, many based in China, as well as the Romanian company Vimetco. Mountaintop removal mining destroys habitat and clogs the streams and rivers below with silt and the byproduct chemicals emerging from the mine. As with the vast majority of Ghana’s forest reserves, legal logging takes place on the land, though the participant companies regularly harvest more trees than they were allotted, and seldom employ environmentally-responsible forestry practices.

Illegal logging is also rampant in the park, and locals eat the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frogs. SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana plans to educate the local people about the ecological value of the Atewa Hills. We will also be building capacity in the surrounding villages: training the locals in beekeeping and mushroom farming so they have new income and food sources that reduce their need to exploit the reserve.

Papilio antimachus

The Atewa Hills are the headwaters for the Densu, Ayensu and Birim rivers, which supply drinking water to about 5 million Ghanaians. The rivers will forever be degraded if Atewa is mined, preventing it from carrying out its ecosystem services.

Creating the Atewa Hills National Park is SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s most important current campaign. Success would be a huge victory for Ghana’s frogs, Ghana’s people and for worldwide environmental conservation efforts, but it will not be easy: there are many influential companies and individuals who profit off of the continued exploitation of the Atewa Range Forest Reserve and will work diligently to block the new national park. Fortunately, the will of the people can overcome the existent power structure if the people are dedicated and well-organized. We at SAVE THE FROGS! & SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana will be doing our part, and we welcome your financial assistance and volunteer time.

The Atewa Range Forest Reserve is Ghana’s most biodiverse — and most threatened — wilderness area. There is wide consensus among scientists and NGO’s that the reserve should be protected as Ghana’s 6th national park: the Atewa Hills National Park. SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is working with domestic and international organizations to make the Atewa Hills National Park a reality. Located near Kibi, halfway between Accra and Kumasi, the Atewa Range Forest Reserve is home to the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog (Conraua derooi; a close relative of the world’s largest frog, the Goliath Frog Conraua goliath). Numerous other amphibian species as well as a diverse non-amphibious flora and fauna live in the reserve.The Atewa forest is listed as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by BirdLife International and is home to 700+ butterfly species.

Save The Frogs GhanaAs recently as 2007, the multi-national ALCOA was seeking permission to conduct mountaintop-removal bauxite mining on three mountains in the reserve. There is continuous threat from other mining companies, many based in China, as well as the Romanian company Vimetco. Mountaintop removal mining destroys habitat and clogs the streams and rivers below with silt and the byproduct chemicals emerging from the mine. As with the vast majority of Ghana’s forest reserves, legal logging takes place on the land, though the participant companies regularly harvest more trees than they were allotted, and seldom employ environmentally-responsible forestry practices.

Illegal logging is also rampant in the park, and locals eat the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frogs. SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana plans to educate the local people about the ecological value of the Atewa Hills. We will also be building capacity in the surrounding villages: training the locals in beekeeping and mushroom farming so they have new income and food sources that reduce their need to exploit the reserve.

The Atewa Hills are the headwaters for the Densu, Ayensu and Birim rivers, which supply drinking water to about 5 million Ghanaians. The rivers will forever be degraded if Atewa is mined, preventing it from carrying out its ecosystem services.

Creating the Atewa Hills National Park is SAVE THE FROGS!Ghana’s most important current campaign. Success would be a huge victory for Ghana’s frogs, Ghana’s people and for worldwide environmental conservation efforts, but it will not be easy: there are many influential companies and individuals who profit off of the continued exploitation of the Atewa Range Forest Reserve and will work diligently to block the new national park.

The Atewa Range Forest Reserve was established as a national forest reserve in 1926, and has since been recognized as one of Ghana’s Globally Significant Biodiversity Areas. The Atewa Range Forest Reserve is located near Kibi town, to the west of the Accra–Kumasi road. This range of hills, aligned approximately north–south, are steep-sided with more or less flat summits. They represent the last remains of the Tertiary peneplain that once covered southern Ghana and are characterized by very ancient bauxitic soils. The reserve lies within the moist semi-deciduous forest zone. About 17,400 ha of the reserve is upland evergreen forest. Atewa is one of only two Forest Reserves in Ghana in which this forest-type occurs and these two reserves together hold 95% of the upland evergreen forest in the country. The diverse flora contains submontane elements, with characteristic herbaceous species, and abundant and diverse epiphytic and terrestrial ferns; many plant species found here are not known to occur elsewhere in Ghana,including Celtis durandii. The Atewa Forest Reserve has over 150 different species of ferns. Two of these species of fern are not found anywhere in the world. The bovals (seasonal marshy grasslands on bauxite outcrops), swamps and thickets that occur here are also thought to be nationally unique.

An unusually high 155 bird species are found in the Atewa Range Forest Reserve. This avifauna includes a significant number of nationally rare species such as Afep pigeon (Columba unicincta), olive long-tailed cuckoo (Cercococcyx olivinus),African broadbill (Smithornis capensis), least honeyguide (Indicator exilis), spotted honeyguide (Indicator maculatus), common bristlebill (Bleda syndactylus), and blue-headed crested flycatcher (Trochocercus nitens). Raptors such as the Congo serpent eagle (Dryotriorchis spectabilis), Urotriorchis macrourus, Polyboroides typus, Accipiter tachiro and Stephanoetus coronatus also occur here. There are also six bird species of global conservation concern including the brown-cheeked hornbill (Bycanistes cylindricus) and the Nimba flycatcher (Melaenornis annamarulae, the first time this bird has been recorded in Ghana.

Six endemics butterfly species Mylothris atewa, Deudorix sp. nov., Cupidesthes sp. nov., Anthene aurea, A. helpsi and Acraea kibi,occur here. The highest diversity of butterflies in Ghana are found here, including 575 of the 925 species known to occur in Ghana. This is largest number of butterfly species yet recorded from a single small forest anywhere in West Africa. The magnificent Papilio antimachus, whose wingspan is the widest in the world is found in the Atewa Range Forest Reserve.

Royal antelope (Neotragus pygmaeus)

There are also 32 species of amphibians found in the Atewa Range Forest Reserve, including the critically endangered frog species (Conraua derooi) whose presence in Atewa may represent the last viable population in the world. There are also 40 species of snakes found in the Atewa Range Forest Reserve. There are over 40 species of mammals found here including Yellow-backed duiker (Cephalophus silvicultor), Black duiker (Cephalophus niger), Bay duiker (Cephalophus dorsalis), Maxwell’s duiker (Cephalophus maxwellii), Royal antelope (Neotragus pygmaeus), Pel’s flying squirrel (Anomalurus pelii), West palm squirrel (Epixerus ebii), African civet (Civettictis civetta), African palm civet (Nandinia binotata), Long-tailed pangolin (Uromanis tetradactyla) and six species of primates, including two species of global conservation concern: Geoffroy’s pied colobus (Colobus vellerosus) and the olive colobus (Procolobus verus).

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Near-record Burmese Python Caught in Everglades National Park

Burmese python (Python bivittatus) over 18 feet in Everglades National Park in July 2015    United States National Parks    Invasive species in Everglades National Park   National Parks of the World

The Burmese Python (Python bivittatus) Invades Everglades National Park

In July, University of Florida researchers captured a female Burmese python, measuring over 18 feet and weighing 133 pounds in the Everglades National Park. The Burmese python was first introduced to Florida through the pet trade, and during the last decade this invasive species has taken over the top predator spot in Everglades National Park, lowering populations of native small mammals and birds. This invasive species is threatening to permanently change the ecosystem of the Everglades National Park. Large Burmese pythons eat larger prey species found in the Everglades National Park, such as the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and potentially even the rare, critically endangered Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi).

Although this python species is relatively docility and easy to handle when young, it grows very rapidly and an adult Burmese python is a very powerful and potentially dangerous animal capable of inflicting severe bites and even killing a human being by constriction. Adult Burmese pythons also consume large amounts of food and can become expensive to keep resulting in some irresponsible pet owners releasing their pets into the wild. As a result, the importation of the Burmese python into the United States was banned in 2012 by the U.S. Department of the Interior for this reason.

In its native range in Southeast Asia (India, China, the Malay Peninsula, and some islands of the East Indies), the Burmese python can grow to 20 feet and is one of the five largest snakes in the world, along with the reticulated python (Python reticulatus), green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), African rock python (Python sebae), and the amethystine python (Morelia amethistina). The Burmese python is primarily a nocturnal rainforest dweller. A young python is equally at home in the trees as it is on the ground; however, as the Burmese python grows and becomes heavier, it spends more of its time the ground. The Burmese python is also an excellent swimmer and can stay submerged for nearly thirty minutes before surfacing to breath.

Although the Burmese python has been getting most of the media attention there are also a number of other invasive species of animals in Everglades National Park. More than 25 percent of all species of mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes in Southern Florida are now exotic species.

The following are just some of the exotic species that have been found in Florida:

Insects


Madagascan hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa
European cricket (Acheta domesticus)

Fishes

pike killifish (Belonesox belizanus)
oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)
Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus)
snakehead (Channa marulius)
peacock bass (Cichla ocellaris)
walking_catfish (Clarias batrachus)

Amphibians

Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)
green house frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris)
giant toad (Rhinella marina)
coqui (Eleutherodactylus coqui)

Reptiles

spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus)
African rock python (Python sebae)
amethystine python (Morelia amethystinus)
reticulated python (Python reticulatus)
green anaconda (Eunectes murinus)
common boa (Boa constrictor)
Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus)
green iguana (Iguana iguana)

Birds

spotted nothura (Nothura maculosa)
Abdim’s stork (Ciconia abdimii)
wooly-necked stork (Ciconia episcopus)
white stork (Ciconia ciconia)
black-necked stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus)
scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber)
griffon-type old world vulture (Gyps sp.)
white spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia)
king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa)
sacred ibis (Threskironis aethiopicus)
Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis)
greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber)
Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata)
Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca)
spot-billed duck (Anas poecilorhyncha)
white-cheeked pintail (Anas bahamensis)
Hottentot teal (Anas punctate)
Philippine duck (Anas luzonica)
Bar-headed goose (Anser indicus)
Bean goose (Anser fabalis)
Greylag goose (Anser anser)
Swan goose (Anser cygnoides)
Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata)
Ringed Teal (Callonetta leucophrys)
Coscoroba Swan (Coscoroba coscoroba)
Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Whooper Swan (Cygnus Cygnus)
Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)
West Indian Whistling-Duck (Dendrocygna arborea)
White-faced Whistling-Duck (Dendrocygna viduata)
Orinoco Goose (Neochen jubatus)
Rosy-billed Pochard (Netta peposaca)
Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea)
Common Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna)
Great Black-Hawk (Buteogallus urubitinga)
Common Black-Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus)
Hook-billed Kite (Chondrohierax uncinatus)
Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus)
Crane Hawk (Geranospiza caerulescens)
Harris’ Hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus)
Chukar (Alectoris chukar)
Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus)
Scaled Quail (Callipepla squamata)
Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus)
Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus)
Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris)
Common Peafowl (Pavo cristatus)
Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus)
Gray-necked Wood-Rail (Aramides cajanea)
Gray Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum)
Black Crowned Crane (Balearica pavonia)
Sarus Crane (Grus Antigone)
Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio)
Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis)
Rock Dove (Columba livia)
Inca Dove (Columbina inca)
Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneate)
Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto)
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis)
Ringed Turtle-Dove (Streptopelia risoria)
White-winged Dove (Zenaida asiatica )
Masked Lovebird (Agapornis personata)
Peach-faced Lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis)
Fischer’s Lovebird (Agapornis fischeri)
Yellow-crowned Parrot (Amazona ochrocephala)
Orange-winged Parrot (Amazona amazonica)
Red-crowned Parrot (Amazona viridigenalis)
White-fronted Parrot (Amazona albifrons)
Yellow-shouldered Parrot (Amazona barbadensis)
Lilac-crowned Parrot (Amazona finschi)
Festive Parrot (Amazona festiva)
Red-spectacled Parrot (Amazona pretrei)
Red-lored Parrot (Amazona autumnalis)
Mealy Parrot (Amazona farinose)
Turquoise-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva)
Yellow-headed Parrot (Amazona oratrix)
Yellow-naped Parrot (Amazona auropalliata)
Hispaniolan Parrot (Amazona ventralis)
Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)
Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna)
Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao)
Military Macaw (Ara militaris)
Red-shouldered Macaw (Ara nobilis)
Chestnut-fronted Macaw (Ara severa)
Yellow-collared Macaw (Ara auricollis)
Orange-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga canicularis)
Green Parakeet (Aratinga holochlora)
Blue-crowned Parakeet (Aratinga acuticaudata)
Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga wagleri)
Mitred Parakeet (Aratinga mitrata)
Crimson-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga finschi)
Red-masked Parakeet (Aratinga erthogenys)
White-eyed Parakeet (Aratinga leucopthalmus)
Hispaniolan Parakeet (Aratinga chloroptera)
Peach-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga aurea)
Brown-throated Parakeet (Aratinga pertinax)
Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii)
Orange-chinned Parakeet (Brotogeris jugularis)
White-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris versicolurus)
Yellow-chevroned Parakeet (Brotogeris chiriri)
Tui Parakeet (Brotogeris sanctithomae)
Greater Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)
Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis)
Tanimbar Cockatoo (Cacutua goffini)
White Cockatoo (Cacutua alba)
Burrowing Parrot (Cyanoliseus patagonus)
Eclectus Parrot (Eclectus roratus)
Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)
Red Lory (Eos bornea)
Chattering Lory (Lorius garrulous)
Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulates)
Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus)
Black-hooded1 Parakeet (Nandayus nenday)
Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus)
black-headed parrot (Pionites melanocephala)
white-crowned parrot (Pionus senilis)
Rueppell’s parrot (Poicephalus rueppellii)
Senegal parrot (Poicephalus senegalus)
red-rumped parrot (Psephotus haemantonotus)
dusky lory (Pseudeos fuscata)
Malabar parakeet (Psittacula columboides)
moustached parakeet (Psittacula alexandri)
plum-headed parakeet (Psittacula cyanocephala)
blossom-headed parakeet (Psittacula roseate)
rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri)
Alexandrine parakeet (Psittacula eupatria)
gray parrot (Psittacus erithacus)
green-cheeked parakeet (Pyrrhura molinae)
maroon-bellied parakeet (Pyrrhura frontalis)
maroon-fronted parrot (Rhynchopsitta terrisi)
rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematod)
ornate lorikeet (Trichoglossus ornatus)
scaly-breasted lorikeet (Trichoglossus chlorolepidotus)
violet touraco (Musophaga violacea)
Schalow’s turaco (Turaco schalowi)

Mammals

sambar deer (Cervus unicolor)
elk (Cervus elaphus)
Pallas’s mastiff bat (Molossus molossus tropidorhynchus)
Mexican red-bellied squirrel (Sciurus aureogaster)
nutria (Myocastor coypus)
capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris)
crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)
vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops)
squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus)
nine-banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)
feral pig (Sus scrofa)
jaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarondi)

More videos about the Burmese python invading the Everglades National Park

18 Foot Burmese Python Captured In Everglades National Park

Burmese Pythons Swarm South Florida’s Everglades National Park

2012 Record-breaking Burmese Python in Everglades National Park

Everglades Invasives

Invasive Species of Florida

Pets Gone Wild

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Redwood National Park is home to the some of the tallest trees in the world !

Redwood National Park  - Tall Trees

Redwood National Park

Redwood National Park is home to the tallest trees in the world the coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens). Redwood National Park was established in 1968, and is home to old-growth coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens). Coast redwoods can grow to nearly 400 feet tall and live to be 2,000 years old. Redwood National Park has a mosaic of habitats that includes prairie and oak woodlands, spruce, hemlock, Douglas-fir, berry bushes, and sword ferns understory. This national park also features two rivers, the Smith River and Klamath River, various small streams, and nearly 40 miles of pristine Pacific coastline.

Redwood National and State Parks were designated a World Heritage Site on September 5, 1980 and have also been designated an International Biosphere Reserve.

Redwood National Park is home to a wide range of mammal species ranging from the tiny shrews to the Roosevelt elk, weighing over a half a ton. Once almost extinct in California, the Roosevelt elk is now making a comeback Redwood National Park.

More than 65 terrestrial mammals species are found in Redwood National Park. Many of these mammals reside in the national park year-round; however some, such as several bat species, reside in the national park only during the breeding season or during migration.

The following are some of the mammal species found in the Redwood National Park:
Virginia oppossum (Didelphis virginiana) – non-native
Marsh shrew (Sorex bendirii)
Pacific shrew (Sorex pacificus)
Trowbridge shrew (Sorex trowbridgii)
Vagrant shrew (Sorex vagrans)
American shrew-mole (Neurotrichus gibbsii)
Broad-handed mole (Scapanus latimanus)
Coast mole (Scapanus orarius)
Townsend’s mole (Scapanus townsendii)
Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus)
Western red bat (Lasiurus blosevillii)
California myotis (Myotis caifornicus)
Fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes)
Little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus)
Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis)
Long-legged myotis (Myotis volans)
Yuma myotis (Myotis yumanensis)
Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus)
Silver-haired bat (Lasiurus noctivigans)
Townsend’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii)
Pallid bat (Antrozous pallidus)
Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)
Brush rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani)
Mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa)
Chipmunk (Tamias sp.)
California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi)
Douglas squirrel (Tamiasciurus douglasii)
Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus)
Western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus)
Botta’s pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae)
Bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea)
Deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus)
Pacific jumping mouse (Zapus trinotatus)
California vole (Microtus californicus)
Sonoma tree vole (Arborimus pomo)
Red tree vole (Arborimus longicaudus)
Western red-backed vole (Myodes californicus)
Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus)
American beaver (Castor canadensis)
Porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum)
Coyote (Canis latrans)
Gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)
Black bear (Ursus americanus)
Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus)
Raccoon (Procyon lotor)
Short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea)
Long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata)
Mink (Mustela vison)
Fisher (Martes pennant)
Marten (Martes caurina)
Striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis)
Spotted skunk (Spilogale gracilis)
River otter (Lontra canadensis)
Black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus)
Roosevelt elk (Cervus canadensis)
Bobcat (Lynx rufus)
Mountain lion or cougar (Puma concolor)
Steller sea lion (Eumatopias jubatus)
Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus
Killer whale (Orcinus orca)
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaengliae)

Redwood National Park is also home to nearly 300 species of birds, including the whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), sanderling (Calidris alba), western sandpiper (Calidris mauri), spotted sandpiper (Actitis macularis), western snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus), Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia), California brown pelicans (Pelicanus occidentalis), short-tailed albatross (Phoebastris albatrus), double-crested cormorant, pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), common murre (Uria aalge), common merganser (Mergus merganser), bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), osprey (Pandion haliaeus), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), white-tailed kite (Elanus leucurus), acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus), california quail (Callipepla californica), western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica), western bluebird (Sialia mexican), black-throated gray warbler (Setophaga nigrescens), yellow warbler (Setophaga petchia), American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus), Vaux’s swift (Chaetura vauxi), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), Steller’s jay, raven (Corvus corax), Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), barred owl (Strix varia) – non-native, wild turkey (Mellagris gallopavo) – non-native, western meadowlark, coot, belted kingfisher (Meaceryle alcyon), marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), as well as, several species of gulls, ducks, grebes, flycatchers and loons.

Reptiles and amphibians found in the parks include the northwestern ringneck snake, northern red-legged frog, Pacific giant salamander, rough-skinned newt and sea turtles, .

There are over 180 freshwater and marine species of fishes found in the national park. including the Coho or silver salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), pink or humpback salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus), western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsonii), Sacramento suckers (Catostomus occidentalis), Klamath small scale suckers (Catostomus rimiculus), prickly sculpin (Cottus asper), coastrange sculpin (Cottus aleuticus), three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi) and eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus).

Butterflies found in Redwood National and State Parks include the following:

Family Papilionidae – Swallowtails

Clodius Parnassian Parnassius clodius
Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)
Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)
Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon)

Family Pieridae – Whites & Sulphurs

Pine White (Neophasia menapia)
Mustard (Veined) White (Pieris napi sequoia)
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)
Large Marble (Euchloe ausonides)
Sara Orangetip (Anthocharis sara)
Gray Marble (Anthocharis lanceolata)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)
Western Sulphur (Colias occidentalis chrysomelas)

Family Lycaenidae – Gossamer-wings


Tailed Copper (Lycaena arota)
Gorgon Copper (Lycaena gorgon)
Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides)
Golden Hairstreak (Habrodais grunus)
Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)
Hedgerow Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium)
Bramble Hairstreak (Callophrys perplexa)
Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus)
Western Pine Elfin (Callophrys eryphon)
Nelson’s Hairstreak (Callophrys gryneus nelson)
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)

Family Lycaenidae – Blues

Western Tailed-Blue (Everes amyntula)
Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon)
Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes bayensis)
Silvery Blue (Glaucopsyche lygdamus)
Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)

Family Nymphalidae – Brushfooteds

Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele eileenae) Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene)
Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe laurina)
Hydaspe Fritillary (Speyeria hydaspe)
Pacific Fritillary (Boloria epithore chermocki)

Family Nymphalidae – Brushfooteds

Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)
Field Crescent (Phyciodes campestris pulchellus_
Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta)
Edith Checkerspot (Euphydryas editha)
Satyr Comma (Polygonia satyrus)
Green Comma (Polygonia faunus)
“Zephyr” Hoary Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)
California Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis californica)
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
West Coast Lady (Vanessa Annabella)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
Lorquin’s Admiral (Limenitis lorquini)
California Sister (Adelpha bredowii)
Common Ringlet (Coenonympha tullia californica)
Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala)
Great Arctic (Oeneis nevadensis)
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Family Hesperiidae – Skippers

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)
Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades)
Western Cloudywing (Thorybes diversus)
Propertius Duskywing (Erynnis propertius)
Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)
Two-banded Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus ruralis)
Common Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus communis)
Arctic Skipper (Carterocephalus palaemon)
Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)
Common Branded Skipper (Hesperia comma mattoonorum)
Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado mattoonorum)
Mardon Skipper (Polites mardon)
Sachem Skipper (Atalopedes campestris)
Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides)
Rural Skipper (Ochlodes agricola)
Common Roadside Skipper (Amblyscirtes vialis)

Other invertebrates found in the national park includes the banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus), western pearlshell mussels (Margaritifera falcata) – the longest living freshwater invertebrate in the world, yellow-spotted millipede (Harpaphe haydeniana), California mussel (Mytilus californianus), purple or ochre seastar (Pisaster ochraceus), aggregating anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima), various limpets (Collisella spp.), flat porcelain crab (Petrolisthes cinctipes), black turban snail (Tegula funebralis), periwinkle snail (Littorina scutulata), hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.), white sea cucumber (Eupentacta quinquesemata), various isopods (Idothea spp.), black leather chiton (Katharina tunicata) and purple shore crab (Hemigrapsus nudus).

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Akagera National Park Receives Seven Lions

The Lion is Re-introduced into Rwanda

African lion (Panthera leo)

During the 1994 Rwandan genocide, nearly 15 years ago, the lion population in Rwanda was wiped out. The Rwandan lion ((Panthera leo) became extinct in the Akagera National Park after poisoning by local cattle herders. Now the luxury safari company, andBeyond, is doing its part to reintroduce lions back into Rwanda.This week andBeyond, donated five lionesses from the Phinda Private Game Reserve in South Africa to the Akagera National Park in Rwanda. With the two male lions donated by Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, this will become a founder population for the Akagera National Park.

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